Monthly Archives: November 2013

Snow Retention 101 Published Article

Combining properly designed snow guard equipment with professional layouts are the secret to snow retention success.howieThe most effective strategy is to hold the snow and ice with multiple rows of protection, as opposed to trying to stop sliding snow and ice down by the eave. The two most common reasons for snow guard failures result from amateur/insufficient layouts, or failure to follow the installation instructions. It is very rare to see a properly designed and installed system fail. Snow guard systems are relatively inexpensive in relation to the amount of protection they provide. Premium products from reliable manufacturers, combined with conservative spacing layouts, will help reduce the liability associated with the sudden release of snow and ice on metal roofs. Here are some basic things to consider when planning snow guards. – See the rest of the article at: http://www.designandbuildwithmetal.com/Columnists/Writers/howie_scarboro_11_19_13.aspx

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Snow Guards and Proper Installation Procedures

The two most common snow guard attachment methods are with Adhesive and with Screws.  Once you determine which is the best installation methods for your project, it’s time to install your snow guards.

Installation Methods:

ADHESIVE METHOD

Adhesive attachment is the simplest method and the most popular.  Be sure that you understand the curing temperatures required for adhesive attachment.  Surebond SB190 requires 672 hours at 50F or higher in order to fully cure.

•    Obtain layout from SpacingTool.com and mark the row placement with string lines.  Do not use  chalk lines.
•    Use alcohol wipes to clean the attachment surface, but do not let the cleaner touch the guards.
•    Cut wide tip on Surebond tube and apply to the entire bottom of the guard.  When straddling a minor rib, be sure to completely fill the gap.
•    Press down to the panel with guard face pointed upslope. Be sure you are getting adhesive squeeze-out around the perimeter of the guard.  This ensures that you have full coverage with no air pockets between the guard and the panel.
•    With gloved hand, finger wipe around base of the guard.
•    Proceed to next guard.

MECHANICAL ATTACHMENT METHOD

Mechanical attachment(screw-down) is a very durable attachment method and should only be done on mechanically fastened non-floating roofs.  Be sure to use #14 galvanized roofing screws with attached neoprene washers and NovaFlex sealant.  We offer screws for metal or wood purlins.  Be sure to specify when you order.

•    Obtain layout from SpacingTool.com and mark the row placement with string lines.  Do not use chalk lines.  It is important to get the screws into either metal purlins or 2” of wood so the row spacing may need to be adjusted based on your purlin spacing.
•    Pre-drill the starter holes with ¼” drill bit before getting on roof.
•    Use alcohol wipes to clean the attachment surface, but do not let the cleaner touch the guards.
•    Cut wide tip on NovaFlex Sealant tube and apply to the entire bottom of the guard.  When straddling a minor rib, be sure to completely fill the gap.
•    Press down to the panel with guard face pointed upslope. Be sure you are getting NovaFlex squeeze-out around the perimeter of the guard.  This ensures that you have full coverage with no air pockets between the guard and the panel.
•    Install 2 #14 galvanized screws and tighten until the washer is slightly compressed.
•    With gloved hand, finger wipe around base of the guard.
•    Proceed to next guard.

If you have any questions regarding the proper layout or installation of your snow guards, please see the video below or call us at 800.SNOJAX.1.

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